by Angel Propps

Lou Williams stood in front of the huge window that dominated most of his living room. One hand twitched at the curtains he had moved aside just enough to peek through. The other rested on the butt of the old revolver he had taken down from its box in the back of the closet. A dreamlike expression rode his wrinkled old face as he stood there, caught between wondering if that window could indeed act like a magnifying glass and burn right through him, and the vivid memory of bringing his wife Sally home to that house for the first time.

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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Cover Art by Pierre Smit

Pierre Smit

one of my personal favourites, i always felt, were my drawings for "The Block," back in um..SW#03..or the one for "Deadfellas" in SW#09.. but now it probably has to be 'ANNA NIEMAND" (to cite someone else's title for it), i did for the cover of SW#12..
i think she came out damn sexy.. (it's all her though, not me..:)

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by Joe Vaz

Firstly let me apologise for the lengthy silence. Things have come to pass in Something Wicked Land that we were hoping to avoid and have spent a good deal of the last 7 weeks trying to come up with alternatives, which, I think, we have.
Issue 20 will be available for sale as an e-Magazine eventually, as it is not actually finished yet. We will be releasing it slowly over the next few months, starting with the already mentioned “The Time Hangs Heavy”, by Angel Propps, on May 1st, followed by CS Fuqua’s “Demons”, Taylor Hanton’s “Lanchester Square” and Grey Freeman’s exquisite ghost story, “Promises”.
We also have an interview with Alastair Reynolds and review of his latest book, Blue Remembered Earth, which, as above, will be published in due time.
All of this and more, still coming, I just don’t know when.

Issue 20 (Apr 2012)
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interview by Vianne Venter

This story came out of a love of Lovecraft and Arthur Machen -- especially Machen, in this case. Machen's stories and novels are some of the most wonderful and terrifying out there, I think, but one thing that bothers me in some of them is a sense of female characters as both victims and objects of horror. I wanted to write a story that both paid homage to everything I love about Machen and addressed or turned the tables on this issue a bit. The story also came out of a lot of broader thinking I'd been doing about love and relationships.

Issue 19 (Mar 2012)
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by Nick Scorza

It is all because of the book, that accursed book I came across in my employ as a dealer in antiquities. I did not choose the profession, but rather awoke to find myself immersed in it – being something of an antiquity myself, even as a young man. I loved all old things, whether from the past century or the past millennium. I was mad for them, but books I prized above all else. Is there anything more wonderful than a book? It is a treasure trove – the wealth and wisdom of the dead preserved for the living as no hoary pharaoh could have hoped for. In books I sought the same commune with things greater than myself that others sought from the church. To me, any book was a bible.

Issue 19 (Mar 2012)
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by Joe Vaz

Many, many years ago Brandon Auret and I spent most of our days studying drama at Pretoria University of Technology, and most of our nights either rehearsing for plays, performing them or playing guitar and singing covers in bars and restaurants all over Pretoria, sometimes getting paid in pizzas and beer. Hey, what else did we need?

Issue 19 (Mar 2012)
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review by Deon van Heerden

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Ltd PB 752 pages RRP £9.00 (Kindle £9.99)

When I heard that Stephen King was releasing a time-travel novel, I found myself excited and apprehensive in equal measure; time-travel novels are pretty much the multi-disc concept albums of the literary world, and even the finest authors can easily stumble and embarrass themselves when traversing this uneven, but well-trod, ground. And yet, somehow, 11/22/63 manages to be almost impossibly good, a historical-fantasy-thriller-romance novel, which excels at every one of these.

From Issue 19 (Mar 2012)
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interview by Vianne Venter

In my first attempt at the story, she wasn't blind. That was okay, I suppose, but I'm always looking for ways to push the stories and ideas just a bit further. There have been an uncountable number of horror stories about a pretty young woman being menaced by a murderous nutjob. You've read it, I've read it, so what's the point in rehashing it? Quite why I settled on her being blind as opposed to anything else, I don't remember now. It made her stand out a little more, gave the story some of the energy I needed to push through it.

Issue 19 (Mar 2012)
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by Peter Damien

If there was pain from the small equator of raw flesh and blood, she did not feel it. She went mad, that first day, a madness the pain could not penetrate. Her mind filled with rage and despair, the animalistic panic at being trapped like this, being snatched away. What was left of her mind was filled with those last few moments: the sound of scuffling, the sound of Eric shouting at her to run, goddammit, get the hell outta here, get the – and then the sound of his voice being cut off by a thunderclap explosion which left her ears ringing.

Issue 19 (Mar 2012)
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interview by Vianne Venter

I’m not sure what I believe. I like to think that when we die it is however we think it will be.

Issue 19 (Mar 2012)
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